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Green Heron (Butorides Virescens)

From what I have observed, the Green Heron shares some traits with the bigger Bare-throated Tiger Heron. Both maintain their necks coiled most of the time, and elongate them up to twice the size of their body when they are ready to attack. Both walk in a stealthy manner, not making a single sound, as they approach to unsuspecting prey. Both are startled easily and fly far away when you are too close. The differences are that the Green Heron is more likely to be found perching high up in the trees, and the obvious size difference; the Green Heron is pretty small, the size of a duck, while the Tiger Heron is bigger than a turkey. They stalk prey while wading in shallow waters using their long feet and toes or from the water edge, sometimes standing motionless for minutes until they launch their attach and grab their prey.

Great Kiskadee (Pitangus sulphuratus)

The Great Kiskadee is a very common bird in most of Costa Rica’s territory; many people can identify it based on its plumage or song, and indeed they can be very noisy. In particular, groups of up to five individuals may perch in branches while rapidly agitating their wings and calling each other with a high-pitched “Kiskadee” song, from where the English name is taken. My grandfather used to say that he would knew when I was coming, because this bird would start to call “Christopher, Christopher”. Of course I believed him, until I was old enough 🙂

Locally it is known as “Pecho Amarillo”, though some people call that name to the also common Tropical Kingbird. There are a few species that are very similar to the Great Kiskadee, like the Social Flycatcher and the Boat-billed Flycatcher, but they can be differentiated by size, song or range; also the rufous on the wings is diagnostic. It is a very common and noisy species under the rain. These bold birds will fight with hawks and toucans in flight, defending their eggs or chicks from predators.