Inca Dove (Columbina inca)

The inca dove is a small dove that forages mainly in the ground; it is very common in Ciudad Colón, along with the bigger White-winged Dove. They frequently perch in groups of three or four in branches, and groom each other with their bills. It has a scaled look, which helps them to camouflage in the ground, specially during the dry season when the grass turns yellow. Their iris is red and lacks any distinct orbital skin.

In Costa Rica, there is a legend that essentially considered this species’s song a premonition of the death of a relative. Elders would say that if this dove was singing, then someone on the family would die. Due to this fame, they were hunted for much of the twentieth century by people who believed in the story. Nowadays, their song is very much melancholic, but the legend has not been carried on for the younger generations, so they no longer face this threat.

One does not have to go far away from home to practice creating great pictures of wildlife. Fortunately, these Inca Doves are very common at home and they have grown accustomed to people’s presence, so they do not mind me lying with my belly on the ground. After this picture, this individual walked right besides me, within arms reach.
Inca Dove - Columbina inca - Tortolita Colilarga (San Juan, Tórtola)
Small with a mottled brown pattern, it can easily disguise itself on the ground, specially when the grass has dried up
Inca Dove - Columbina inca - Tortolita Colilarga (San Juan, Tórtola) (2)
The red eye is very conspicuous in this small dove

One thought on “Inca Dove (Columbina inca)

  1. Pingback: Common Ground-Dove (Columbina passerina) | The Nature Admirer

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s